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is closing the gap in these swing states, there will be pressure on president obama to show up for the second debate. >> the president's critics say that the president was sleepwalking through history, like he wanted to be somewhere else. did this turn it around for>> yi have ever said this on television before. i told you so. he has never been a natural debater. he always has to be beaten almost by his staff into being a good debater. the only time i thought he was a superb debater was with john mccain. they really had to knock him out to do that. he is a competitor, he will be back, but romney has done this nsistently through the campaign. he has been a very good debater when he had to be. he had good debates in the primary when he needed to. obama, this was a missed opportunity. looking down all the time was lethal. >> colby, where was the president's fastball? >> he did not have it. he did not have anything. they are dancing in end zone now, the republicans, but we're not even yet at halftime. the esident did not bng his game, and you cannot blame anybody, the moderator, jim lehrer, how h
from new york, denver los angeles and washington. president obama and governor romney faced off tonight in the first of three debates before election day on november 6th. domestic policy was in focus during the 90-minute showdown at the university of denver. the platform gave govern romney an opportunity to reignite his campaign which has suffered some this summer. they sparred across a range of issues. >> there's a various done of small businesses across the country saying what's the effect of obamacare in your hiring plans. three quarters said it makes us less likely to hire people. i just don't know how the president could come into office, facing 23 million people out of work, rising unemployment and economic crises at the kitchen table, and spend his energy and passion for two years fighting for obamacare instead of fighting for jobs for the american people. >> the irony is that we've seen this model work really well, in massachusetts. because govern romney did a good thing, working with democrats in the state to set up what is essentially the identical model, and as a consequence,
east has grown under president obama's leadership. that was the charge mitt romney leveled today in a speech at the virginia military institute. good evening. i'm jeffrey brown. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the newshour tonight, we assess the differences between the two candidates on foreign policy. >> brown: then, we update the spread of the deadly meningitis outbreak, infecting more than a hundred people in nine states. >> woodruff: ray suarez examines the stem cell discovery that earned two scientists the nobel prize in medicine. >> brown: margaret warner updates the state of the presidential race with stuart rothenberg, susan page, and andrew kohut. >> woodruff: and we talk to author salman rushdie about his memoir on life on the run after being sentenced to death by iran's religious leader. >> if you had said to me, here's what's going to happen in the next 12 years, what sort of shape do you think you'll be in at the end? i would probably not have bet on myself to be in good shape, no. yet i somehow did survive it. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour.
be able to support. >> he wants to portray president obama has an outlier in american foreign policy. in fact, one of the foreign policy advisors made the point that president obama in his view had departed from 70 years of bipartisan agreement, an agreement in which you would sort of focus on your allies first and not on engaging your adversaries. what i think was missing from e sech was any direct engagement with the question of the bush years and the bush doctrine. >> rose: we conclude with lisa randall, she is a theoretical physicist at harvard talking about new discoveries based on the higgs boson theory. >> one of the things that was so interesting about this discovery is it didn't have to look like this. there are other types of particles, other sectors that can make the higgs megaisim in work. the higgs boson is in some sense the simpleest possibility but it could be more complicated and that's o ofhe raso that the experiments are now studying in detail the properties of the higgs boson, to find out is it really the simplest example that implement this is mechanism or is it s
obama won this state in 2008 by the slimmest of margins with help from a large african-american turnout. four years later in a down economy it looks like his challenge will be even greater. >> woodruff: and we talk with national public radio's greg allen. he focuses on the outreach to hispanics in the tar heel state. >> ifill: then margaret warner updates the investigation into the assault on the u.s. consulate in libya. >> woodruff: we look at new findings showing australia's great barrier reef has lost half its coral in the last 27 years. >> ifill: and we close with snapshots of three of this year's macarthur genius award winners, each with a unique view of war. >> people tend to look at the military, they tend to look at war and they tend to look at conflict as something very black and white. it's not like that at all. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: creating new enriching experiences. through intel's philosophy of "invest you for the future" we're helping bring these new capabilities to market. we're investin
8% for the first time since january 2009. president obama cheered the figures; mitt romney criticized the administration for not creating enough jobs. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, what do the numbers tell us about the true state of the labor market? we get an assessment. >> woodruff: then, gwen ifill reports on missouri's senate contest where the democratic incumbent has unexpectedly grabbed the lead. >> this the united states senate. mark shields an david brooks >> brown: mark shields and david brooks analyze the weeks news. >> woodruff: and ray suarez previews another political match to watch, thousands of miles south in venezuela, where long- time leader hugo chavez faces a young challenger. >> the election marks a watershed moment for the world's second largest oil producing nation. and a critical supplier of crude oil to the u.s. its number one customer. >> woodruff: that's all ahead tonighs nehour >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: carnegie corp >> and with the ongoing support of th
in the presidential campaign. it was the kind of news that president obama hoped for, just over a month before the election and two days after a sub-par debate outing. >> more americans entered the work force, more people are getting jobs. >> brown: indeed, september's unemployment rate, calculated by a survey of households, fell to 7.8%. that's the lowest since the president took office. a second survey, of businesses, showed that employers added a net of 114,000 jobs, and job gains for july and august were revised upward by 86,000 the president touted the numbers in a campaign stop at george mason university in fairfax, virginia. >> now, every month reminds us that we've still got too many of our friends and neighbors who are looking for work. there are too many middle class families that are still struggling to pay the bills. they were struggling long before the crisis hit. but today's news certainly is not an excuse to try to talk down the economy to score a few political points. it's a reminder that this country has come too far to turn back now. >> brown: that was a swipe at republican m
. >> brown: three months after upholding president obama's health care law, the supreme court is back with a docket that may even rival last year's term for drama. the justices will decide a case on affirmative action in higher education, and are expected to take up disputes on same-sex marriage, civil rights law, and more. the term opened today with arguments in another controversial case: whether businesses can be sued in u.s. courts for human rights violations that occur in foreign countries. marcia coyle of the "national law journal" was in the courtroom this morning, and is back with us tonight. welcome back. >> nice to be back. brown: let us spulate, as the lawyers sa that last year was a blockbuster. >> absolutely. brown: new this term has some potential itself as well, right? affirmative action. >> yes, it does, jeff. it would be a different kind of blockbuster term. last term was really a lot about the structure of government under the constitution. did congress exceed its law-making powers under the constitution when it enacted the health care law? what role do state governm
and not obama had promised to increase defense spending. only 23% were aware that payroll taxes had decreased during obama's term in office. only slightly more than half knew that paul ryan is the republican vice presidential nominee. the director of the annenberg center, kathleen hall jamieson, our master media decoder is back with us. welcome. >> thank you. >> so who's responsible for the widespread unawareness or ignorance that you report in your survey? is it the candidate, the media, or the voter? >> it's all three. and fortunately, we have the opportunity with presidential debates to do something that reliably increases knowledge. we've been studying presidential debates for a long time as a scholarly community. and to our surprise, we consistently find that those who watch debates, regardless of the level of knowledge they come in with, come out with more accurate knowledge as a general group. and they do this because those who haven't paid a great deal of attention have a lot to learn. those of us who've paid a lot of attention still missed things. the news may have covered something
youill and very vague about the stick. >> obama is brilliant in a speech, a peach is different than when you are in an argument and when you are in an argument if you don't bring passion to your argument the other side is generally going to win and what you say almost matters as much as how you say it, and the scary thing about politics is, substance aside, you know, a lot of the journalist whose know the substance on these issues are debating with themselves who was more accurate and who was not. when you listen to the person in the street, the voter, the juror who i speak to, they say i understood romney, i didn't understandbama i liked romney's style, i didn't like the president laying down. >> rose: we conclude this evening with barbara, a computer scientist and author, her book on voting heens is called broken ballots, will your vote count. >> we want americans to know a great democracy deserves a great voting system and right now we have a third grade voting system which is just not worthy of our democracy, we are also very concerned that if there is a very close election or multip
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: president obama questioned whether the real mitt romney was at last night's debate-- a criticism romney's spokesman dismissed as damage control. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the "newshour" tonight, we et the latt on the candidates' appearances today, as they reprised last night's messages about jobs and the economy. >> brown: plus, we have our own debate on the differing approaches to taxes and deficit reduction. >> woodruff: then, we turn to the war in syria, as skirmishes spill over the border with turkey for a second day in a row. >> brown: we come back to last night's debate with two takes on how it was received. ray suarez talked to voters in the swing state of florida. >> i didn't hear what i need to about jobs. that is the number one interest of generally everyone in the united states. >> woodruff: and in our regular "daily download" segment, margaret warner explores how the face off played in social media. >> brown: and it hasn't happened in baseball in 45 years. we lo
>> this is nbr. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: i'm tom hudson. president obama and mitt romney are back on the campaign trail, but still debating taxes. >> susie: i'm susie gharib. the feds launch one of the largest crackdowns on medicare fraud. $430 million in scams leads to arrests from coast to coast. >> tom: and we'll introduce you to a company hoping to become the mcdonald's for healthy eaters. >> susie: that and more tonight on nbr! >> tom: it was right back to the campaign trail today for president obama and mitt romney. the president went on the attack after what's been perceived as a lackluster debate performance. and the president accused governor romney of not telling americans the truth about what president obama calls romney's $5 trillion tax plan. darren gersh, tonight, looks at what the real impact of the romney tax plan could be on the american economy. >> reporter: here's where the president gets that $5 trillion number he used again today. governor romney's plan to cut tax rates by 20% would add up to about $5 trillion over ten years, assuming no other
this week for mitt romney and barack obama to connect with reality, to connect with the lives we actually live. it didn't happen. the 90-minute debate went by, for example, without a word about immigration. not a thing said about the countless people trapped in our muddled policy. and this in colorado, a swing state, where both romney and obama have been courting the large hispanic vote. that wouldn't have happened if my guest on this week's broadcast had been moderating the debate, but their participation was rejected by the tiny group of insiders who set the rules. that's a shame because george ram mows and maria elena sorena are two of the most popular journalists. they work for the most important spanish language network in the country, univision. i met them for the first time earlier this week when they were in town to receive the emmy award for lifetime achievement from the national academy of television arts and sciences. here's part of the video presentation that introduced them to the emmy audience. >> they're two of the most well-recognized journalists in the united states. pion
" coverage of the first presidential debate between president barack obama and former governor mitt romney. i'm again ifil. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. tonight's debate will be moderated by our own jim leerer and will start a little over a minute from now, from the magness arena. >> after the debate we'll talked to arrow shapiro and scott horsily in denver, and christina bellantony. >> woodruff: you can follow along online on our live stream and live plog. two very quick thoughts from mark and david. mark, it come downs to this. >> in a rare race it's become increasingly a referendum on the challenger rather than the incumbent. can the challenger mitt romney make this a referendum on the president. >> who has the toughest job? >> romney. maybe jim lehrer. format i love. much more demanding on jim but better for us. >> ifill: we're looking forward to what jim has to say tonight. it's a big night and we'll go to the convention hall and hoar from our own jim lehrer. >> lehrer: good evening, from the ma nag mess arena in colora. i welcome you to the first of the 2012 presidential debates
happy than a healthy job market. from recent college grads to president obama, their future might look more certain if companies really ramped up hiring. economists say there's too much uncertainty on the horizon for that to happen any time soon. the good news is that firms have stopped cutting jobs. the bad news is they're still too nervous to hire more than a handful of new workers. friday, economists predict the september employment report will show a modest 113,000 new positions were added, barely better than august. still, some believe current data underestimates what's really happening with hiring. >> the perception of the labor market is probably more like a world where we're adding 150,000 jobs a month, which isn't good, but certainly better than the numbers are printing which is only around 100,000 or so. >> reporter: anecdotal evidence supports that assessment too. this new york staffing firm primarily places workers in administrative jobs, and says it's finding the market surprisingly strong. today, good candidates are quickly turning temporary positions into full time jobs.
. that's the lowest level since january 2009, when president obama took office. even more remarkable is the reason for the drop. >> the unemployment rate decline was not because people dropped out of the labor force. to the contrary. the labor force actually but the household survey estimate of employment increased even more. >> reporter: the household survey shows total employment rose by 873,000. that's the biggest gain since ronald reagan was president. but there's a catch. two-thirds of those jobs are part-time positions, taken because no full-time work was available. and there's another troubling sign: >> what we have is hiring that is concentrated, most recently, in the government sector. hiring that is concentrated, most recently in education and healthcare. a little bit of positive news coming from construction. but in a lot of the business services and goods-producing industries and manufacturing, things look pretty soft at this moment. >> reporter: in addition, 2,000 temporary jobs were cut, which is often looked at as a barameter of future employment. but, the average work
to have you with us. >>> president obama and governor mitt romney squared off in their first presidential debate wednesday. earlier in the week, thousands of conservative christians gathered in philadelphia to pray for the future of the country. organizers said the rally was not political, although same-sex marriage and abortion were widely denounced. they also called for 40 days of prayer leading up to the election. >>> meanwhile, this weekend, a conservative christian group is urging pastors to challenge federal law by endorsing political candidates from the pulpit. those who do so risk losing their churches' tax-exempt status. according to a recent survey by the christian polling organization lifeway, 87% of pastors believe pastors should refrain from making political endorsements. the survey included both evangelical and mainline clergy. >>> the supreme court opened its new term on monday and a majority of the justices -- six of the nine -- attended the annual red mass, held the nday before at st. matthew's cathedral in washington. at the annual event, catholic leaders encourage the j
&p; it's up about a point. >> reporter: i'm darren gersh. still ahead, both mitt romney and barack obama want to put more americans back to work. but is job training the right answer? we'll take a look. >> tomsix months before e credit crunch hit full force, j.p. morgan bought failing investment bank bear stearns. that was in 2007. now, j.p. morgan faces a lawsuit, claiming it inherited massive fraud on the part of the company it purchased. the civil lawsuit alleges systemic fraud with the packaging and sale of mortgage- backed securities by bear stearns before it was taken over by j.p. morgan. the bank says it intends to fight the case. eric schneiderman is the attorney general of new york. >> eric, you represent the people of new york state. what did your citizens lose in the deals thaw are accused of being fraudulent? >> new yorkers, like people all over the united states bought shares in mortgage backed securities, pension funds invested in them. people bought homes baseed on what they thought was the realistic value of the housing market. we've learned that the housing bubble, sxlt
of the obama administration not to deal with the housing crisis as part of the financial collapse. >> very much so but you have to remember he inherited the problem. bush hadn't even talked about it. obama said let's do something. but then what they proposed was simply inadequate. >> rose: was it because they focused on the financial sector at the exclusion of the housing issue? >> basically, basically. part of it was they were worried at the time that the kinds of things you needed to do. restructure the mortgage, write down the mortgages, would weaken the banking system. and they were more focused on helping the bankers than homeowners. you know, ode citizens. and i think that was a big mistake. >> rose: when you look at 2008 and the decisions made first by the bush administration, paulson, bernanke, geithner and later decisions by the president, summers and geithner and others or bernanke, were the right decisions at the time to deal with the financial crisis to avoid going over into some abyss? >> they prevented us from going into the abyss, i think that's right. >> rose: so what they did w
celebrate president barack obama's election to president but that doesn't mean we fought all the problems, that inclusion and diversity we have lot of work to do. i think that we have to set about doing that work, we need to improve k-12 education and close thoseducation gaps that we see, absolutely we do. but you don't do that with policies that strip away pell grants, that defund public education. you don't do that with policies that make it really difficult for students to get student loan or to close down opportunities for very qualified african american students to get in to college and universities and to more than survive it but to be great success. >> closing the gap, school choice being one of those that would help african americans and latinos, if parents would have their choice to be able to choose for their children what schools to go to instead of being stuck in the failed schools. >> and the -- >> wait, shy not have been given public money to send my son to private school. we need to support our public schools and improve the education that vast majority of children are gett
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)